Workstream 1 Key Research on Green Infrastructure: what is the science telling us?

  Introduction

 EU Projects on Green Infrastructure

 NERC projects and programmes relevant to Green Infrastructure

 Other Academic Research on Green Infrastructure

 Other Research Council UK projects on Green Infrastructure



Workstream 2 Policy and Practice on Green Infrastructure: What are the key lessons emerging? ?

 Capturing Green Infrastructure Policy and Practice



Workstream 3 What are the key opportunities to link research and practice in Green Infrastructure?

 Green Infrastructure Partnership Evaluation



Workstream 4 Understanding our growing environmental vocabulary and how green infrastructure fits in

 Understanding our growing environmental vocabulary in England Connecting Green Infrastructure, Natural Capital, Ecosystem Services and Net Gains within the English Planning System



Workstream 5: What does good Green Infrastructure Policy look like?

 Green Infrastructure Planning Policy Assessment Tool



Workstream 6 : Working with the Green Infrastructure Partnership



EU Projects on Green Infrastructure

This page captures key projects that are looking at green infrastructure. In particular they have been prioritised to reflect the 4 key questions I am asking. 

1. With a focus on the peri urban space PLUREL  shared experiences about the management of peri urban areas  across 12 EU partner areas. Green infrastructure becomes core to the improved management of these forgotten spaces.

2. Naturvation   is about the use of nature based solutions to the challenges of urban development. Currently the use of grey infrastructure and technology-driven solutions dominates urban planning.the following outputs are really useful.

3. Planning for environment and resource efficiency  in European Cities and Towns PERFECT integrates the many benefits of green infrastructure into the planning and investment for the future of urban and rural areas. It seeks to influence the policy-making process by raising awareness of the social, environmental and economic potential of green infrastructure.

4. GREEN SURGE  seeks to identify, develop and test ways of linking green spaces, biodiversity, people and the green economy in order to meet the major urban challenges related to land use conflicts, climate change adaptation, demographic changes, and human health and wellbeing. It will provide a sound evidence base for urban green infrastructure planning and implementation, exploring the potential for innovation in better linking environmental, social and economic ecosystem services with local communities.

5. BEGIN stands for 'Blue Green Infrastructures through Social Innovation'. Organizations from Belgium, Germany, Norway, Sweden, the United Kingdom, and The Netherlands are working together to find solutions for climate change

6. GROW GREEN Innovation will be the focus of GROW GREEN, which stands for "Green Cities for Climate and Water Resilience, Sustainable Economic Growth, Healthy Citizens and Environments." This new five-year demonstration project aims to achieve climate and water resilience in cities. Funded by Horizon 2020, the EU’s Framework Programme for Research and Innovation, it is intended to showcase benefits from nature-based solutions in urban landscapes

7. Green Infrastructure Scotland Nature Scotland (formerly Scottish Natural Heritage) are the Lead Partner for the ERDF Green Infrastructure Strategic Intervention which distributed £15 million of ERDF money through two competitive funds: the Green Infrastructure Fund, and the Green Infrastructure Community Engagement Fund.The Green Infrastructure Strategic Intervention aims to improve Scotland’s urban environment by increasing and enhancing greenspace in our towns and cities, especially close to areas of multiple deprivation. This will make these areas much better for our biodiversity and more attractive for people to live and work in, and therefore attract jobs, businesses and further investment.

8. IGNITION aims to develop innovative financing solutions for investment in Greater Manchester’s natural environment. This investment will help to build the city region’s ability to adapt to the increasingly extreme impacts of climate change.Working with nature, solutions such as rain gardens, street trees, green roofs and walls and development of green spaces can help to tackle socio-environmental challenges including an increase in flooding events, water security, air quality, biodiversity and human health and wellbeing. This project, backed by €4.5 million from the EU’s Urban Innovation Actions (UIA) initiative, brings together 12 partners from local government, universities, NGOs and business. The aim is to develop the first model of its kind that enables major investment in large-scale environmental projects which can increase climate resilience. By 2038 this will enable an increase in Greater Manchester’s urban green infrastructure coverage by 10% from a 2018 baseline.